School teacher – Astoria Schools http://astoriaschools.org/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 08:45:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://astoriaschools.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-31T000949.167.png School teacher – Astoria Schools http://astoriaschools.org/ 32 32 How to shake off the “October blues” and rediscover the joy of teaching https://astoriaschools.org/how-to-shake-off-the-october-blues-and-rediscover-the-joy-of-teaching/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 08:45:58 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/how-to-shake-off-the-october-blues-and-rediscover-the-joy-of-teaching/ It’s not just you: October is notoriously the most difficult month of the year for teachers. Teachers are starting the school year with a “sense of possibility” and energized by summer, said Roxanna Elden, author and former teacher. But as the weeks pass, some of their best ideas and plans fall through. Work piles up […]]]>

It’s not just you: October is notoriously the most difficult month of the year for teachers.

Teachers are starting the school year with a “sense of possibility” and energized by summer, said Roxanna Elden, author and former teacher. But as the weeks pass, some of their best ideas and plans fall through. Work piles up and they don’t get enough sleep. Classroom management can become a major source of stress.

“And then you have a moment in your class that feels like your fault, makes you feel like a terrible teacher, … and then you still deal with the rest of the year,” said Elden, who now writes a weekly newsletter. information for teachers and offers confidential one-on-one “office hours” sessions.

Ellen Moir, the founder of the New Teacher Center, a nonprofit that works to strengthen the practice of beginning teachers, said the time frame between mid-October and Thanksgiving broke the “disillusionment phase.”of the school year. That’s when teachers’ morale drops when they realize things aren’t going as well as they had hoped.

This time of year is especially challenging for new teachers, but it can also be exhausting for seasoned teachers, especially as schools continue to emerge from the pandemic.

“It’s a very, very long stretch while you’re tired,” Elden said. “[You’re] hit the wall, you can barely make it through the week, and there are just endless weeks [of the school year] in front of you.”

Teacher stress in general has increased since before the pandemic, and a nationally representative survey conducted in early 2022 found that teacher job satisfaction levels appear to be at historic lows. Teachers say they are struggling with a higher than normal workload due to staff shortages, students are disengaged or misbehaving and political pressures have affected their ability to do their jobs.

In a nationally representative survey conducted from August 31 to September 15, the EdWeek research center asked more than 1,000 teachers for their advice on rediscovering the joy of teaching. Their responses ran the gamut, from setting professional boundaries to collaborating with peers to focusing on students.

As for Elden, his advice is threefold:

  • Take a step back and know that you are not alone.
  • Take time over the weekends to think strategically about one thing that can make a difference the following week.
  • Make sure you get enough sleep.

Teachers may say to themselves, “’You should work harder, otherwise you don’t care about your students,’” Elden said. But “getting enough sleep is one of the main things that makes you fit to be in a classroom with a child.”

Here are some of the biggest tips from other teachers for getting out of the doldrums and remembering the good things about teaching. The answers, taken from the EdWeek Research Center survey, have been slightly modified.

Shake up your routine

“You have to get out of the planning rut with the same plan [or] book every year. Yes, teach the same lesson/norm, but find new ways to teach it. Plus, you get a new “fresh” moodlet every fall. They need this cheerful teacher. They need this [teacher] who once loved the job more than he dreaded it,” said a primary English/language teacher.

Another elementary teacher suggested embracing a different type of work: “Find or create a passion project. The kind you would dream of as a bright-eyed student dreaming of his class. It could be a writing club, a book club, a community project, etc. Talk to your boss. It will make you look good, it will make the teaching closer to what you imagined, and it will give you something to look forward to.

Several teachers – and Elden – have suggested changing grades or subjects after several years if the school year becomes monotonous. But even if you can’t make a big change, each year can still hold surprises, teachers said.

“It’s new every day and every year,” said a high school teacher. “Have fun reflecting and adapting your lessons and the new students you are challenged to reach and help.”

Set boundaries and stick to them

“Do not respond to e-mails after contractual hours. Don’t spend your own money, not a penny. Never give out your home phone number. In short, have the boundaries of a professional to command the respect a professional deserves,” said a high school ELA teacher.

A high school foreign language teacher emphasized “learning that we can’t do everything and allowing ourselves to accept that some things can’t happen anymore.”

A college science teacher said, “Learn to say no to the administration when they keep asking you to do more. Focus on your courses and what you were hired to do.

And several teachers emphasized the importance of self-care, in whatever form works best.

“Get up early to have some quiet time,” said an elementary school teacher. “Whether it’s for training, reading, walking or simply vegetating while watching TV. Try this moment of calm every day.

Focus on the fun of learning

Teachers said they experience joy watching students make a connection or discovery. A 1st grade teacher spoke of “the moment when students discover something other than the world in themselves”.

A primary school teacher said, “Monitor progress from the beginning to the end of the year. We do this for children, and their growth is worth it. »

“Try to focus on the kid who really needs help,” said another primary school teacher.

And several teachers recommended focusing on learning that happens every day, rather than high-stakes exams.

“Take the time to get to know your students. Create activities where students work together in small groups. Move around the classroom observing and answering their questions,” said an elementary school teacher. “Don’t obsess over state tests and district assessments. Find what interests and engages your students. The rest will come. »

Collaborate with your colleagues

“Look for supportive colleagues who are willing to help you rediscover your passion for teaching,” said an elementary school teacher.

According to teachers, professional learning communities can be a good source of energy, as can professional development, as long as it is useful. A high school ELA teacher said that “meaningful professional development with like-minded professionals – professional development that I choose” can be a spark of rejuvenation.

A high school fine arts teacher said, “Spend time observing other master teachers, even if you have been in the field for a long time.

A primary school teacher advised educators to find like-minded people and “hold on for a wild ride. Be sure to share with them outside of school so you have more in common than work.

Adopt the humor

“Find the humor in everyday life”, advised a specialized educator. An elementary school teacher said, “Find a way to laugh, every day, with your students.”

And teachers urged their peers to make time to have fun and be silly with their students in order to build strong relationships and bring joy to school days.

“Be in the moment with your students,” said an elementary school teacher. “Joke, sing, share, learn something new together for 5-10 minutes every day. Start each day with a five-minute mindfulness meditation. Challenge them to compete with you in something silly. Remember that most children need you to see them. They do the best they can with what they are given. If it’s no good, give them more tools.

‘Remember your why’

Above all, the teachers said, remember why you became a teacher. For most teachers, that reason is students and the love of learning.

“Children ARE the joy of teaching. Let them remind you why you do what you do every day. If we ignore the bureaucracy and focus our work on the children, the problems will become less daunting,” said a high school ELA teacher.

Another high school ELA teacher recommended teachers reconnect with their former students to remember the impact they are having. And several teachers said they try to find at least one positive thing about each school day.

“Look for the little things, they’re there,” said an elementary special education teacher. “That face a student makes when a concept finally clicks. The first hug you receive from a student who was having trouble logging in.

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2 Daphne High School Teachers Receive $2,000 Grant https://astoriaschools.org/2-daphne-high-school-teachers-receive-2000-grant/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 22:22:18 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/2-daphne-high-school-teachers-receive-2000-grant/ DAPHNE, Ala. (WKRG) – Betsy Anderton, a teacher at Daphne High School, has noticed that the pandemic is straining both students and teachers. To fight against feelings of fatigue and stress, she found a way to put them at ease when they come to school. Recently, the two teachers received $2,000 from Voya Financial, Inc.’s […]]]>

DAPHNE, Ala. (WKRG) – Betsy Anderton, a teacher at Daphne High School, has noticed that the pandemic is straining both students and teachers. To fight against feelings of fatigue and stress, she found a way to put them at ease when they come to school.

Recently, the two teachers received $2,000 from Voya Financial, Inc.’s 2022 Unsung Heroes Awards Contest. Voya is a corporation that recognizes teachers who go above and beyond for not only their students, but also their staff and school district.

Anderton said the money was used for essential items like greenhouse tools, gardening tools and plant pots. She and fellow teacher, Priscilla Dabney, came up with a solution called biophilic design.

“Biophilic design has to do with integrating nature and our innate tendency to learn better, to feel better,” Anderton said.

Anderton and his students have created gardens full of plants, which will soon be displayed throughout the school.

We realized we had this unique opportunity to grow houseplants and put a plant in every classroom of teachers and staff, so wherever students go there is nature, in every room” , Anderton said.

During lessons, students work outside in the garden or greenhouse. Anderton said it helps students clear their minds and relieve stress.

“Oh I’m so excited, it was great decorating the classroom, it’s a brand new building, so it was wonderful to start from scratch with this biophilic design concept and bring all those natural elements to inside was really fun,” Anderton said.

Stay ahead of the biggest stories, breaking news and weather in Mobile, Pensacola and the Gulf Coast and Alabama. Download the WKRG News 5 news app and make sure to enable push alerts.

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School board fires Shawnee Mission North math teacher Alex Morris after arrest https://astoriaschools.org/school-board-fires-shawnee-mission-north-math-teacher-alex-morris-after-arrest/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 03:25:00 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/school-board-fires-shawnee-mission-north-math-teacher-alex-morris-after-arrest/ A Shawnee Mission North High School math teacher was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of child sexual abuse. Alexander David Morris, 32, has been charged with five counts of sexual exploitation of a child. Court documents allege the incidents occurred between January 31 and September 15. Morris was incarcerated at the Johnson County Detention Center. His […]]]>

A Shawnee Mission North High School math teacher was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of child sexual abuse. Alexander David Morris, 32, has been charged with five counts of sexual exploitation of a child. Court documents allege the incidents occurred between January 31 and September 15. Morris was incarcerated at the Johnson County Detention Center. His bail was set at $150,000. The school board held a special meeting on Wednesday, firing Morris hours after his arrest. “Well, I think it’s sad. I mean, you know, they’re supposed to be someone the kids look up to and they have what’s going on is just awful,” Janie Thomas said. Morris was also a swimming coach in the district. “I’m glad they found out about him. I’m glad he was taken out of the school system. You know, those kids need someone they can admire,” Thomas said. Morris is due in court on Thursday.

A Shawnee Mission North High School math teacher was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of child sexual abuse.

Alexander David Morris, 32, has been charged with five counts of sexual exploitation of a child. Court documents allege the incidents occurred between January 31 and September 15.

Morris was incarcerated at the Johnson County Detention Center. His bail was set at $150,000.

The school board held a special meeting on Wednesday, firing Morris hours after his arrest.

“Well, I just think it’s sad. I mean, you know, they’re supposed to be someone the kids look up to and they have what’s going on is just awful,” Janie Thomas said.

Morris also coached swimming in the district.

“I’m glad they found out. I’m glad he was taken out of the school system. You know, these kids need someone they can look up to,” Thomas said.

Morris is due in court on Thursday.

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Former El Cajon school teacher gets 21 years in prison for sex crimes https://astoriaschools.org/former-el-cajon-school-teacher-gets-21-years-in-prison-for-sex-crimes/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 20:09:11 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/former-el-cajon-school-teacher-gets-21-years-in-prison-for-sex-crimes/ THE CAJON — A former El Cajon religious school teacher who pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting several young women and underage girls was sentenced Monday to more than 21 years in state prison. Dustin Steven Sniff, 41, was arrested in 2019 and pleaded guilty on August 31 to nine sex crimes. The case involved six […]]]>

A former El Cajon religious school teacher who pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting several young women and underage girls was sentenced Monday to more than 21 years in state prison.

Dustin Steven Sniff, 41, was arrested in 2019 and pleaded guilty on August 31 to nine sex crimes.

The case involved six victims, two of whom were students at Christian High School, where Sniff previously worked. San Diego County Sheriff’s Lt. Chad Boudreau said none of the crimes took place on campus.

Sniff also met other victims through a website called Model Mayhem, the lieutenant said. The site offers to connect models and photographers in Los Angeles, New York, Atlanta, Chicago and London.

The victims were between the ages of 16 and 22 at the time of the crimes, and the criminal complaint says four victims were assaulted between 2007 and 2010, while the crimes against the last two victims occurred between late 2016 and early 2017.

Sniff pleaded guilty on August 31 to nine sex crimes.

During his sentencing hearing, Sniff said in a statement, “Many times in my life I’ve shown people the person I aspired to be, but in reality I wasn’t. J I also lied and manipulated people to get what I wanted.

Regarding the victims, he said, “What I did was entirely my fault and I want to apologize to them and their families.”

Superior Court Judge Daniel Lamborn sentenced Sniff to an expected prison term of 21 years and four months.

Staff reporter David Hernandez contributed to this report.

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Specially designed t-shirts and stickers will honor the legacy of a popular college professor https://astoriaschools.org/specially-designed-t-shirts-and-stickers-will-honor-the-legacy-of-a-popular-college-professor/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 16:06:03 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/specially-designed-t-shirts-and-stickers-will-honor-the-legacy-of-a-popular-college-professor/ Kelli Michael with other members of the Mulrennan Relay For Life team. Kelli Michael, a science teacher at Mulrennan Middle School, died suddenly of acute lymphoblastic leukemia last month. Kelli taught for 27 years in the Hillsborough County school system, teaching locally throughout her career, starting at Alafia Elementary, then teaching at Buckhorn Elementary and […]]]>
Kelli Michael with other members of the Mulrennan Relay For Life team.

Kelli Michael, a science teacher at Mulrennan Middle School, died suddenly of acute lymphoblastic leukemia last month. Kelli taught for 27 years in the Hillsborough County school system, teaching locally throughout her career, starting at Alafia Elementary, then teaching at Buckhorn Elementary and most recently as a science teacher at Mulrennan Middle School. She is survived by her husband, Brian Michael, and two children, Sean and Shane. Kelli was recently selected by the Tampa Bay Lightning as the most valuable teacher for January future goals in the NHL’s Most Valuable Teacher program. Additionally, Kelli was once named Buckhorn Elementary School Teacher of the Year.

She was also a Les Mills aerobics instructor at the YMCA and had a loyal following. Kelli advocated for the education of the mind and the fitness of the body as she believed it was also good for the mind. She was a great role model for those around her, as she actively participated in 5K events for various causes.

Her favorite event and charity was Relay For Life because she had loved ones who were suffering or had died from cancer. She has been an active participant through her school and has been able to help raise awareness about this tragic disease that touches the lives of so many.

Because of her dedication to Relay For Life, this year Buckhorn Elementary School, Mulrennan Middle School and Durant High School are joining together to honor Kelli. They created a campaign to raise funds with the sale of a personalized t-shirt and stickers.

“She loved the schools, this community and Relay for Life. The theme, ‘Curing Cancer Would Be A Sweet Relay’, paired with Kelli’s favorite animal, the koala, will create a shirt we hope to see everywhere,” Brian said.

The shirts cost $20 and are on sale until Friday, October 14. Proceeds will go to Relay For Life and a fund to help her two children.

Local businesses, such as Daily Blends of Valrico, put his sticker on their store window. The family would like to see other members of the community and local businesses also support these efforts in their honor.

For more information or to purchase T-shirts and stickers, contact Tiffany Schreffler at tiffany.schreffler@hcps.net.

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Wisconsin college teacher saves great horned owl from football net https://astoriaschools.org/wisconsin-college-teacher-saves-great-horned-owl-from-football-net/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 16:06:06 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/wisconsin-college-teacher-saves-great-horned-owl-from-football-net/ By Jenna Wells Click here for updates on this story PLYMOUTH, Wis. (WDJT) — A Plymouth science teacher is being called a hero after saving the life of an owl, as his middle school students and fellow teachers watched. Abbie Ward, a seventh grade teacher at Riverview Middle School, is known to students and colleagues […]]]>

By Jenna Wells

Click here for updates on this story

PLYMOUTH, Wis. (WDJT) — A Plymouth science teacher is being called a hero after saving the life of an owl, as his middle school students and fellow teachers watched.

Abbie Ward, a seventh grade teacher at Riverview Middle School, is known to students and colleagues for helping animals in need.

When she learned that a great horned owl had been caught in the school football net on Friday, she sprang into action, grabbing scissors and her heavy-duty chemistry gloves.

“By the time we got there it was really, really caught up,” Ward said.

A local wildlife expert told CBS 58 that she often hears of owls getting stuck in sport nets.

“Owls are nocturnal hunters, so they don’t have the best eyesight to see these really thin nets,” said Lindsay Obermeier of the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center.

As Ward patiently untangled the owl and cut the netting, the large bird remained remarkably still.

“He was laying there, and those huge yellow eyes were staring at me the whole time I was trying to get those last bits off,” Ward said. “It’s almost like he knows I’m about to let him go. .”

It was a risky rescue. The Great Horned Owl was born to hunt. Their sharp beaks and talons can be incredibly dangerous.

“If you take your hand and squeeze it, an owl that size can actually grab about six times as hard as you can,” Obermeier explained.

“I wouldn’t have touched him without those gloves that I knew he couldn’t bite or scratch,” Ward said.

After only a few minutes of struggling, the owl spread its wings.

“It just took off, and it was just the best. Everyone was cheering and clapping,” Ward said.

The students watched the owl land on a nearby tree and fly off safely into the woods.

“Congratulations to this teacher! Absolutely phenomenal, brave and exactly what people want to see done to help wildlife,” Obermeier said.

It was a successful ending and a good learning lesson on how to help protect owls if you have sports nets.

“The best thing to do to avoid this whole situation is to remove the net when you’re done using the court,” Obermeier said.

If you are inexperienced in wildlife rescue and encounter an animal in need, Obermeier advises you to keep your distance and call a licensed wildlife rehabilitator to help you.

Note: This content is subject to a strict local market embargo. If you share the same market as the contributor of this article, you cannot use it on any platform.


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Edgefield County School District Names Teacher and Employee of the Year | Aiken standard https://astoriaschools.org/edgefield-county-school-district-names-teacher-and-employee-of-the-year-aiken-standard/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 20:35:00 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/edgefield-county-school-district-names-teacher-and-employee-of-the-year-aiken-standard/ The Edgefield County School District (ECSD) is thrilled to announce that Merriwether Elementary School teacher Tiffany Burton is the school district’s Teacher of the Year, and Hunter Wilson, Special Needs Assistant from Strom Thurmond High School, as District Support Staff Employee of the Year. Each school year, ECSD schools select a Teacher of the Year […]]]>

The Edgefield County School District (ECSD) is thrilled to announce that Merriwether Elementary School teacher Tiffany Burton is the school district’s Teacher of the Year, and Hunter Wilson, Special Needs Assistant from Strom Thurmond High School, as District Support Staff Employee of the Year.

Each school year, ECSD schools select a Teacher of the Year (TOY) and Support Staff of the Year (SSOY). Honorees are nominated and selected by their peers before district-level honors are presented at an annual celebration. This year’s celebration was hosted by the Pine Ridge Country Club.

“Tiffany Burton and Hunter Wilson and our 2022 Teacher of the Year and Support Staff of the Year recipients are all outstanding representatives of the kind of educational excellence we find present in so many of our classrooms. and schools,” said the superintendent of the Edgefield County School District. Dr. Kevin O’Gorman. “We are honored to celebrate them today and every day for all they do for our students and the school district family.”

Burton, a third-grade teacher, thanked her administrators and colleagues for providing so much love and support during her 10 years of teaching at the school.

“I have incredible support from everyone at Merriwether Elementary because without them I couldn’t do what I do,” Burton said. “Merriwether Elementary is a great place and an incredible place to teach. It’s something incredible that I will cherish forever.

Wilson also praised his colleagues for their support.

“I received the greatest support from my colleagues at Strom Thurmond High School,” Wilson said. “It’s a moment I will never forget and I really appreciate this opportunity.”

At Friday’s celebration, Natoshia Ryan, 2022 Bus Driver of the Year, and Kenneth Jackson, 2022 District Office Support Staff Employee of the Year, were also honored.

2022 ECSD Teacher of the Year recipients include Ashley Richards from Douglas Elementary School, Kimberly Rowe from Johnston Elementary School, Leigh Raines from WE Parker Elementary School, Julie Hewston from Johnston-Edgefield Middle School- Trenton, Diane Knight of Merriwether Middle School, Paul Bundy of Strom Thurmond High School, and Michelle Smith of Strom Thurmond Career and Technology Center.

The 2022 ECSD Support Staff of the Year recipients include Allean Oliphant from Douglas Primary School, Brandy Carroll from Johnston Primary School, John Oliphant from Merriwether Primary School, Nikki Burden from WE Parker Primary School, Deborah Williams of Johnston-Edgefield-Trenton Middle School, DeWayne Lee of Merriwether Middle School, and Sunny Covar of Strom Thurmond Career and Technology Center.

Congratulations to our 2022 Teacher of the Year and our 2022 Support Staff of the Year!

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Perth teenager sentenced to 11 months in prison for conspiracy to kill teacher at Willetton Senior High School https://astoriaschools.org/perth-teenager-sentenced-to-11-months-in-prison-for-conspiracy-to-kill-teacher-at-willetton-senior-high-school/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 07:41:46 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/perth-teenager-sentenced-to-11-months-in-prison-for-conspiracy-to-kill-teacher-at-willetton-senior-high-school/ A ‘high-achieving’ student who plotted with a friend to murder a Perth high school teacher has been sentenced to 11 months in juvenile detention. Key points: The girls discussed the school fire before planning the stabbing The girl who was sentenced today hid the knife in her school bag The teacher suffered minor injuries and […]]]>

A ‘high-achieving’ student who plotted with a friend to murder a Perth high school teacher has been sentenced to 11 months in juvenile detention.

The girl, who cannot be identified, was 13 when she and her friend, another then 14-year-old student, took to social media last year to discuss the murder of the teacher at Willetton Senior Highschool.

Perth Children’s Court was told the couple had initially talked about burning down the school, but when that idea was dismissed the 13-year-old sent a message saying “the idea of ​​stabbing should take the on it now”.

The eldest daughter responded saying she would do some ‘research’ before detailing in later posts where and how to stab the teacher in a way that would sever an artery and cause ‘immediate death’.

Willetton Senior High School went into a brief lockdown after the teacher was attacked.(ABC News)

Then, on November 1 last year, the friend brought a knife to school, which the 13-year-old hid in her bag, before returning it to her during recess.

The friend then went to a meeting with the teacher where she told the woman she had a “good surprise” for her, before throwing herself on her.

The police alerted to the role of the young girl

Around the same time, other friends of the girl, who had been told what she was planning to do, sounded the alarm and a member of staff tried to alert the teacher to what was happening. passed.

Because the teacher got up at the same time as the girl threw herself on her, she ended up only sustaining a minor injury near her armpit.

A group of people walk along a pathway in Perth's CBD, photographed from behind.
The girl was accompanied by her parents when she left court in June after admitting her guilt.(ABC News: Joanna Menagh)

The school was closed immediately, but the 13-year-old remained silent until later that day when police were made aware of her role in the crime.

She was originally charged with attempted murder, but prosecutors accepted her guilty plea to the lesser charge of “with intent to do an act that caused bodily harm.”

Willetton SHS stabbing
Other students at Willetton Senior High School sounded the alarm just before the attack.(ABC News)

At a hearing in July, the 13-year-old’s lawyers argued for the girl to be given a community sentence, describing her as a “high-achieving student” who unequivocally accepted that what she had done was wrong.

They also said that most of the details about what was planned came from the friend.

But prosecutors asked that the teenager be given an immediate sentence of detention, and because the president of the juvenile court, Hylton Quail, wanted to consider the possibility, he remanded her in custody to the juvenile detention center of Banksia Hill.

Today the girl, who is now 14, was sentenced to 11 months in juvenile detention, but could be freed after serving half of that. She has been in custody since July 21.

The Professor Could Have Died: Judge

At sentencing, Judge Quail said it was the second time this year that he had to sentence a young person in the context of violence against teachers, although in the previous situation the incident had been avoid.

“This offense is one where general deterrence is important,” he told the court.

Judge Quail described the crime as “shocking” and “completely irrelevant”, saying the girl’s family was “devastated”.

“Your encouragement and support [of the other teenager was] important,” the judge told the schoolgirl, and when there were discussions about the plans, “you didn’t tell anyone about it.

A police car in front of a school
The police were not informed of the girl’s involvement in the plot until later that day.(ABC News: David Weber)

Judge Quail said if the teacher was not moving at the time of the stabbing, she may have died.

The community needed to know that such behavior had serious consequences.

Teacher still in pain after attack

The judge described the continued impact on the teacher as “substantial”, with “profound consequences” as she suffered from PTSD and had reason to question her career and identity.

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School Board recognizes permanent staff | News, Sports, Jobs https://astoriaschools.org/school-board-recognizes-permanent-staff-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 06:03:50 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/school-board-recognizes-permanent-staff-news-sports-jobs/ FAIRMONT– The Fairmont School Board met on Tuesday for their September meeting. During the meeting, they recognized the tenure of the teachers and discussed the official opening of the high school‘s vocational and technical education center (CTE), as well as other matters. Immediately after the approval of the meeting agenda, the board recognized […]]]>

FAIRMONT– The Fairmont School Board met on Tuesday for their September meeting.

During the meeting, they recognized the tenure of the teachers and discussed the official opening of the high school‘s vocational and technical education center (CTE), as well as other matters.

Immediately after the approval of the meeting agenda, the board recognized 11 staff members who were granted tenure. These staff members are teachers, supervisors, or principals who have completed three years with Fairmont area schools or one year with the district if they came from another Minnesota district.

Tenure went to Grade 5 teacher, Allissa VanBrocklin; ESL teacher, Linda Hughes; math teacher, Amanda Weihe; special education teacher, Melinda Chambers; educational coach, Kristine Flohrs; elementary school co-director Brian Grensteiner; kindergarten teacher, Megan Potthoff; second-grade teacher, Maisy Jorgensen; special educator, Robin Armitage; high school co-principal, Chad Brusk; specialist teacher, Brooke Kain.

Following the tenure recognition, the board heard a report from Fairmont Director of Education and Recreation, Stephanie Busiahn. Busiahn has now completed her first year as CER Director and CER has completed a full year at her location at the Southern Minnesota Educational Campus. Over the summer, the CER offered 65 youth and adult programs. The CER had 756 youth participants in sports and recreation programs and 141 participants in adult enrichment programs. Participation in the program was very high across the board, with many activities registering the highest levels of participants recorded for several years.

After Busiahn’s report, the board heard from Superintendent Andrew Traetow.

Traetow said back to school is going very well. Facility staff worked long hours before the start of the school year in order to receive temporary occupancy permission for the school’s new CTE center. Classes have started in the new facility although some minor adjustments and changes still need to be made to the building. Traetow announced that the facility will have its official ribbon cutting and open house following the October 11 school board meeting, which will be held at the new facility. It will be one year to the day after the start of work on the center in 2021.

Traetow provided an update on the district’s COVID-19 reporting system.

“At this time, we will not notify families of individual cases, but we will maintain aggregate data as the school year progresses and make any necessary adjustments,” said Traetow.

When the council discussed financial matters, it accepted two donations. The first one

was a $1,000 grant from the Southwest Initiative Foundation’s Odell Wind Farm Community Fund to purchase new equipment for the robotics team. The second donation was $444 from the Grace Lutheran Church Trust Fund and went to the Fairmont Elementary Student Activities Fund.

Subsequently, the board accepted the resignation of school crossing guard Dave Johnson as well as paraprofessionals Joyce Schmidt, NaTosha Thomas and Karen Flores. The board also approved the employment contracts of CER administrative assistant John Bartscher, substitute teacher Jennifer Streit, early childhood aide Ashley Jones, school crossing guard David Subbert and high school paraprofessional Courtney. Williams.

Prior to the adjournment of the meeting, Board Member Dan Brookens provided an update from the Operations Committee. The district has completed a high school science classroom renovation and expects its new football scoreboard to arrive and be installed before Friday’s game.



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Texas teacher on administrative leave after telling students to call pedophiles ‘people attracted to minors’ https://astoriaschools.org/texas-teacher-on-administrative-leave-after-telling-students-to-call-pedophiles-people-attracted-to-minors/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 18:28:18 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/texas-teacher-on-administrative-leave-after-telling-students-to-call-pedophiles-people-attracted-to-minors/ An El Paso, Texas teacher is on administrative leave and faces fire after telling students to call pedophiles ‘persons attracted to minors’ in an incident that was caught on video and shared on social networks. social media, according to the city’s school district. In an 18-second clip, the Franklin High School teacher can be heard […]]]>

An El Paso, Texas teacher is on administrative leave and faces fire after telling students to call pedophiles ‘persons attracted to minors’ in an incident that was caught on video and shared on social networks. social media, according to the city’s school district.

In an 18-second clip, the Franklin High School teacher can be heard telling students to “stop calling them that. You’re not allowed to label people that.”

“We’re not going to call them that,” the teacher is heard saying in the video. “We’re going to call them MAPs, people attracted to minors. So don’t judge people just because they want to sleep with a 5-year-old.”

The teacher was identified by the El Paso Teachers Association as Amber Parker, who teaches English at Franklin High School.

NBC News contacted Parker, who said she was “not legally authorized to comment at this time.”

Franklin High School’s requests for comment were not immediately returned.

It’s unclear what happened before the 18-second video, or what the context of the exchange was. The El Paso Independent School District declined to answer questions about what led to the class discussion.

The school district was made aware of the incident early last week and quickly launched an investigation, spokeswoman Liza Rodriguez said Friday.

“After a thorough investigation was conducted, on September 6, 2022, at a special board meeting, the board approved the decision to notify a Franklin High School teacher of the proposed dismissal” , she said. “Any allegations of potential misconduct are thoroughly investigated and the safety of our students is a top priority.”

The school district would not release the findings of its investigation or any other information, saying the incident was a “staff matter.”

The board voted unanimously to initiate dismissal proceedings against the teacher, with the next step being “an appeal process governed by the Texas education code,” said Al Velarde, president. advice. The teacher is now on paid administrative leave pending his dismissal, according to Rodriguez.

Ahead of Tuesday’s vote, council vice-chairman Daniel Call said the classroom exchange was taken out of context.

However, Call said he changed his mind after being briefed on the school district’s findings following their investigation on Tuesday.

“At first I was shocked and horrified when I saw the video,” he told NBC News. “Then when I heard she was trying to be sarcastic, I felt bad for her. However, when the district’s investigation into this situation helped me understand the whole story, I didn’t I have no doubt that terminating this teacher is the right thing to do. Any reasonable person hearing the results of the investigation would vote to fire her.”

Call would not share details of the investigation that caused him to change his mind about the incident.

El Paso Teachers’ Association president Norma De La Rosa said union legal staff advised her not to comment on the incident at this time.

“I will be more than happy to comment once the teacher has had an opportunity to appeal and the process is complete,” she told NBC News. “I’m sure by then I’ll have a lot to comment on.”

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