School district – Astoria Schools http://astoriaschools.org/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 03:14:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://astoriaschools.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-31T000949.167.png School district – Astoria Schools http://astoriaschools.org/ 32 32 Columbia County School District Increases Resource Officer Positions https://astoriaschools.org/columbia-county-school-district-increases-resource-officer-positions/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 03:14:00 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/columbia-county-school-district-increases-resource-officer-positions/ COLUMBIA COUNTY. (WRDW/WAGT) – The Columbia County School District is taking steps to keep your students safe this school year. They created a police force for their school resource officers. The district hired more police officers before the first day of school, and they say their new officers are qualified with plenty of experience. As […]]]>

COLUMBIA COUNTY. (WRDW/WAGT) – The Columbia County School District is taking steps to keep your students safe this school year.

They created a police force for their school resource officers.

The district hired more police officers before the first day of school, and they say their new officers are qualified with plenty of experience.

As of 2018, the district has at least one resource officer for every school in the county. With the need for more security, they decided to add more.

We spoke with the Columbia County School District Force Captain to understand why they need more officers.

They go to every school in the district, with two in each high school. A group of 36 school resource officers bring together 700 years of law enforcement experience, allowing them to make a difference at the start of this school year.

“We are a more full-service police station than in the past,” Capt. Gary Owens said.

Previously, the primary function of the District Police was more to report and assist the Sheriff’s Office, but they now take a more active role in handling investigations.

Since the summer, it’s been anything but a break for them.

“We had to start from scratch, starting with the SOP, making sure everything was in place, having meetings with the sheriff’s office, with the police chiefs to make sure we are ready for this challenge” , did he declare.

One challenge they take on is to help break the stigma surrounding police officers and help build a relationship between police officers and children in the community.

“We want to be in contact with the students, to know them on a daily basis, to know their names, so if there is something wrong, we can say ‘Hey how are you?’ and they will feel comfortable,” Owens said.

Although it is now a self-sufficient agency, there is always backup when needed.

“We still have the sheriff’s office and local police departments that we’re going to engage with and be community partners with and we have to work together,” he said.

They have previously worked together to practice different emergency scenarios, such as active shooters.

“Oriented towards this incident, we pray that this never happens in our schools, but we want to be ready, and we are ready, and we have trained to ensure that our officers are competent, able and willing to take this . challenge,” he said.

Copyright 2022 WRDW/WAGT. All rights reserved.

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DC schools’ covid vaccine mandate rare among national school systems https://astoriaschools.org/dc-schools-covid-vaccine-mandate-rare-among-national-school-systems/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 11:02:41 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/dc-schools-covid-vaccine-mandate-rare-among-national-school-systems/ Comment this story Comment DC students ages 12 and older must be vaccinated against the coronavirus to attend school this upcoming school year. DC’s youth vaccination mandate is among the strictest in the nation, according to health experts, and is being enacted in a city with wide disparities in vaccination rates between its white and […]]]>

Comment

DC students ages 12 and older must be vaccinated against the coronavirus to attend school this upcoming school year.

DC’s youth vaccination mandate is among the strictest in the nation, according to health experts, and is being enacted in a city with wide disparities in vaccination rates between its white and black children. Overall, around 85% of students aged 12 to 15 have been vaccinated against the virus, but the rate drops to 60% among black children in this age group.

If the city doesn’t close that gap but strictly enforce the vaccination mandate this fall, students of color — who have experienced disproportionate academic setbacks during the pandemic — could be home in significant numbers next academic year.

“Our goal is that no child misses a single day of school,” Asad Bandealy, head of the DC Department of Health’s Health Care Access Office, said at a press conference this week. at Mary’s Center, a community health clinic where children can be vaccinated. “And that means we have to start now.”

School starts August 29 in the DC system.

A quarter of DC children are behind on routine vaccines, officials say

DC is one of the few districts to make coronavirus vaccination a requirement for attending school. The mandate reflects, in part, the city’s unique education governance structure. The demand came from the 13-member DC Council, not a school board. And because DC is a federal district rather than a state, there is no public health agency the city can come into conflict with.

Elsewhere in the country, the New Orleans The public school system in February added the coronavirus vaccine to its list of required vaccinations for children age 5 and older. The rest of the state was expected to do the same for the upcoming school year, but changed course in May because the vaccines had not yet received full Food and Drug Administration approval for children under 16. Full approval of the vaccine for ages 12 to 15 was granted in early July.

Some of the nation’s largest school districts encourage but do not require children to be vaccinated. The students in New York City Public Schools need to be vaccinated against the coronavirus only if they plan to participate in certain sports, musical theater or other activities that the district deems “high risk.” Los Angeles Unified School District deferred a mandate that was due to take effect in the fall, highlighting vaccination rates among older students and what the district superintendent said was low transmission in schools. According to media reports, about 78% of students ages 12 and older in the Los Angeles District were fully vaccinated by the end of the school year in May.

Meanwhile, only 31% of children in the country between the ages of 5 and 11 have been fully vaccinated. Anne Liu, an infectious disease physician and associate clinical professor at Stanford University, said public health officials want that number to rise.

“I think it’s in the best interests of children, teachers and school staff, and the rest of the city,” Liu said of DC’s coronavirus vaccine requirement, adding that many such mandates are a “positive thing to achieve”. ”

Still, DC has a long-standing reputation for not enforcing its vaccination requirements in schools. But officials say this year will be different and they have an urgent plan to get students vaccinated this summer. They send out flyers, place advertisements at bus stations, send mobile vaccination vans into communities and call thousands of parents whose children’s vaccines have expired. Health clinics are opening hundreds of additional appointments each week for youth vaccinations.

Why some parents are skeptical of covid vaccines for young children

In addition to coronavirus shots, students must receive their routine vaccinations – including measles, polio and whooping cough – to enroll in school. Students have 20 days from the first day of school to comply with vaccination requirements before being banned from attendance. Schools should have data showing which students have been vaccinated to encourage families with unvaccinated students to get vaccinated if they show up on the first day of school without them.

Since the FDA fully authorized the coronavirus vaccine for children ages 12 to 15 this summer, students in that age group have until the end of September to get vaccinated, according to city law. Children under the age of 12 are not required to be vaccinated against the coronavirus because injections for this age group have only received emergency use authorization.

Many students have missed routine medical appointments during the pandemic, and local authorities estimate that a quarter of students are out of date with their vaccines.

Bandealy, DC’s health officer, said high school students have the highest rates of noncompliance.

He noted, however, that some students who were vaccinated in Maryland and Virginia may not be reflected in DC data.

DC’s youth vaccine mandate has been around for nearly a year. Last October, the DC Council introduced legislation calling for the coronavirus vaccine to be on the list of vaccines required for school enrollment.

The law states that the warrant does not go into effect until the shot has received full clearance from the FDA. Once that happens, students have 70 days to get the coronavirus vaccine and stay in school. For all vaccines, students can apply for religious and medical exemptions.

In the Washington, DC metropolitan area is unique in its student mandate. Public schools in Montgomery County — Maryland’s largest school district, with about 160,000 students — have no coronavirus vaccination requirements for students. Under a policy set by the school board, school district employees are required to show proof of vaccination or be tested weekly.

Public schools in Prince George’s County, also in Maryland, have no coronavirus vaccination requirements for staff or students, but required and provided weekly testing for unvaccinated staff during the height of the pandemic.

In other areas of school life, the DC system has been stricter on covid protocols compared to other regional school systems. The school district retained a mask mandate as other school systems dropped theirs. Prince George’s dropped its mask mandate on July 1 and plans to start the school year with a mask-optional policy.

In Northern Virginia school systems, staff vaccinations against the coronavirus are mandatory in public schools in Alexandria City and Arlington. School districts in Fairfax and Loudoun counties do not require employee vaccinations.

Hannah Natanson and Nicole Asbury contributed to this report.

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Denver and Jefferson County school districts are raising hourly wages for support staff struggling to afford food and housing https://astoriaschools.org/denver-and-jefferson-county-school-districts-are-raising-hourly-wages-for-support-staff-struggling-to-afford-food-and-housing/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/denver-and-jefferson-county-school-districts-are-raising-hourly-wages-for-support-staff-struggling-to-afford-food-and-housing/ Amid mounting public pressure, two of Colorado’s largest school districts have approved 20% pay increases for school support staff, with Denver Public Schools pledging to raise pay by more than $4 from hour for many workers this year and Jeffco Public Schools agreeing to raise pay by $3 an hour by September 2023. The wage […]]]>

Amid mounting public pressure, two of Colorado’s largest school districts have approved 20% pay increases for school support staff, with Denver Public Schools pledging to raise pay by more than $4 from hour for many workers this year and Jeffco Public Schools agreeing to raise pay by $3 an hour by September 2023.

The wage increases were prompted, in part, by a steep rise in the cost of living that limited employees in both districts and strained the schools’ ability to fulfill essential roles in the classroom, cafeteria and across the grounds.

DPS will invest about $28.2 million over three years in raising wages for about 2,800 district employees who belong to unions, according to Miguel Perretta, executive director of employee relations and labor. These employees include paraprofessionals, who help teachers with classes and often help individual students and who will start earning $20 an hour starting August 1, up 21%. Their hourly wages will continue to increase by 50 cents each of the following two years so that they will receive $21 per hour starting in August 2024.

Paras assisting students with special needs will receive a starting salary of $21 starting August 1, up 21%. Their hourly pay will also increase by 50 cents each for the next two years. By August 2024, the starting salary for paras serving students with disabilities will be $22 per hour.

For paraprofessionals like Carolina Galvan, who works at Valdez Elementary School in Denver, the pay raise means she can save more money for her family and one day have a shot at home ownership. And with more money in their pockets, some of his colleagues will no longer have to rely on government subsidies for food and shelter.

“Now I put more money into my household,” Galvan, 34, said. “Now I’m a little less stressed.”

Carolina Galvan, a Denver Public Schools paraprofessional, poses for a portrait July 9, 2022 at Valdez Elementary School where she works in Denver. (Olivia Sun, The Colorado Sun via Report for America)

DPS has committed to paying all support staff, including those represented by a union and those who are not part of a union, $20 by August 2024. This includes food service employees , custodial workers and non-union employees, many of whom currently earn $15.87 per hour, Perretta says. Their pay will increase year by year – to $18 per month in August, $19 per hour in August next year and finally $20 per hour in August 2024.

Separately, the minimum starting wage for bus drivers and mechanics in the district will increase on August 1 from $20.43 to $24.40. The district is still finalizing negotiations with the Denver Association of Educational Office Professionals, which represents office workers, Perretta said.

He noted that the DPS will cover the cost of the salary increase with various sources of funding, including $4 million from a central office reorganization and approximately $13.4 million in planned public funding.

DPS wants to “stay competitive in the marketplace,” Perretta said, adding that the higher salaries will hopefully bolster recruitment and retention in support staff roles as the district — like many across the state and the country – faces shortages, especially with its bus driver workforce.

“It’s a huge investment for our workforce, which is well deserved,” Perretta said.

It also gives district staff a sense of stability for the next few years, said Bernadette Jiron, president of the Denver Federation for Paraprofessionals and Nutrition Services Employees.

“It’s a step forward for all of these people…that they know they are valued and that the union is here to make sure they get what they deserve over the next three years.” , said Jiron, whose union has about 1,300 members.

She is “ecstatic” that DPS has finally listened to its employees and rewarded them with the raises they have been fighting for since the spring, especially since the district is understaffed in critical support positions, including paras, food workers and bus attendants.

“I’m tired of being a follower,” Jiron told district leaders. “I need you to be a leader for these employees.”

An essential pay rise for an essential workforce

Galvan, the Valdez Elementary School para, was on the DPS staff who currently brings home $15.87 an hour and couldn’t afford a house, instead living in an apartment in Woodridge with her husband, daughter and mother. She’s largely depended on her husband’s income to make ends meet, and the extra money added to her paycheck will make her “a bit more financially independent as a woman.”

She plans to build a savings account with her raise so her family can stay afloat in the event of another recession and eventually buy a house.

The question of whether she should stay on as a para DPS without enough pay to cover her family’s expenses seems less urgent now, and there’s a sense of respect from the district that wasn’t necessarily there before.

“I’m really happy to see how it all came together, and we’re on the same page now,” Galvan said.

Carolina Galvan, a Denver Public Schools paraprofessional, poses for a portrait July 9, 2022 at Valdez Elementary School where she works in Denver. (Olivia Sun, The Colorado Sun via Report for America)

Meanwhile, the Jeffco Public Schools Board of Education has approved a contract in which hourly pay for support staff members will start at $18 by September 2023, according to a statement released Wednesday by the Jeffco Education Support Professionals Association.

The raise follows a board candidate forum held last fall where Coloradans for the Common Good asked six election candidates to support a $3-per-hour wage increase during of the next two years.

In a statement, paralibrary and JESPA president Lara Center called the pay rise a “historic moment” for staff.

“This is the second year that we have fought for substantial and well-deserved salary increases for our members,” she said.

JESPA, which represents approximately 3,800 support staff, including paras, guards, bus drivers, secretaries and food service workers, and the Denver Federation for Paraprofessionals and Nutrition Service Employees belong to Coloradans for the common good. The organization is made up of congregations, unions, educational institutions, nonprofits and neighborhood organizations, all focused on community issues and have helped raise awareness of the need to pay more for the support staff.

Coloradans for the Common Good also helped organize a rally outside the DPS central office in downtown Denver in July, alongside support staff members to demand higher wages with an increase in the cost of living.

Joyce Brooks, chair of the organization’s steering committee, calls them essential workers.

“They are great support staff for our teachers to help them provide the kind of education our children need in these school districts,” Brooks said, adding that these staff members also give the wider community a boost. overview of what is happening in public schools.

The salary increases will help staff and their families meet basic expenses in the face of inflation while allowing schools to operate with employees who are essential to student success, she said.

“I think we take them too much for granted,” Brooks said, “but teachers can’t teach, administrators can’t administer without these people helping them.”


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Auburn School District Approves Settlement with Trustee Association | Education https://astoriaschools.org/auburn-school-district-approves-settlement-with-trustee-association-education/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 11:45:00 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/auburn-school-district-approves-settlement-with-trustee-association-education/ AUBURN — The Auburn Enlarged City School District School Board has agreed to an agreement with the district’s group of trustees. At a board meeting on Tuesday evening, the nine-member body authorized a resolution for an agreement between the district and the association of trustees regarding the creation and terms of employment of the 11-month […]]]>

AUBURN — The Auburn Enlarged City School District School Board has agreed to an agreement with the district’s group of trustees.

At a board meeting on Tuesday evening, the nine-member body authorized a resolution for an agreement between the district and the association of trustees regarding the creation and terms of employment of the 11-month assistant directors. .

According to the agreement, the district informed the association that it intends to make an 11-month assistant principal option starting in the 2022-23 school year, and “this agreement will terminate with the union contract. current and may at that time be renegotiated. “

The contract states that the parties “acknowledge that the title of principal assistant is exclusively represented by the Association”, specifies the agreement.

Another part of the terms is that any assistant manager assigned to an 11-month job will have their terms of employment governed by their collective agreement, “except as otherwise provided herein.”

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Both parties agree, the agreement continues, that no later than May 30 of each school year, each vice-principal of the association will notify the district in writing of his or her request to work for the following school year as a 11-month employee or 12-month employee. These requests must be approved by the building manager and the district office before June 15th.

The conditions set for 11-month assistant principals are that they will work from August 1 until the last working day of the teachers’ calendar in June and that they will work during school holidays, as is required of other directors of the association.

The agreement says the district won’t require vice principals “to work between the last working day of the teachers’ schedule and July 31,” but may choose to do so if they receive approval from their building superintendent. . The contract also adds that wages and all annual leave days – sick, staff and vacation – will be pro-rated.

The District and Association also agree that “the terms and conditions of this Agreement may not be relied upon by any party as evidence of past practice or practice in any grievance, arbitration, administrative proceeding, litigation or any question whatsoever”.

All Board members present approved the resolution with the exception of Dr. Eli Hernandez. Dr. Rhoda Overstreet-Wilson and Jim Van Arsdale arrived after the vote. After the meeting, Hernandez explained why he voted against it. Having previously served as the Delaware Elementary School principal in the Syracuse City School District, Hernandez said most of the work he does to prepare for the school year happens in the summer.

“We’ve worked so hard to find administrators and then (give) that option, that’s a concern for me,” he said.

• The district enters into an agreement with an administrative mentoring consultant.

The board approved an agreement between the district and Rebecca Kaune, which would provide “professional services focused on administrative mentoring during the 2022-2023 school year.” the agenda for Tuesday’s meeting indicates. The agreement between Kaune and the district stipulated that Auburn would agree to pay up to $13,000 to Kaune for the performance of its services, at $130 per director per month “for 10 months each for a maximum of 10 mentees”. One hour per director per month will be scheduled in advance, the contract indicates, and the schedule will be shared with the executive cabinet team.

Other terms and conditions of the agreement include that Kaune, as an independent contractor, will be responsible for paying federal and state income taxes applicable to the contract and she will not be eligible for Social Security, Workers’ Compensation, Unemployment Insurance, or any other Auburn District employees receive.

Auburn Superintendent Jeff Pirozzolo said after the meeting that Kaune had been an administrative mentor consultant with the district for more than 10 years, and prior to her retirement she served as an administrator in the Central School District of Weedsport and Cayuga-Onondaga. BOCES.

“Her knowledge base, she was a fantastic administrator, and all of our administrators who go through her (mentoring) program are all so grateful because it’s such a valued program that she does with our staff that we want to continue to keep it as long as possible,” said Pirozzolo.

The resolution was unanimously approved by the Board members present.

Managing Editor Kelly Rocheleau can be reached at (315) 282-2243 or kelly.rocheleau@lee.net. Follow him on Twitter @KellyRocheleau.

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Florence One Schools becomes the first SC school district to offer paid parental leave https://astoriaschools.org/florence-one-schools-becomes-the-first-sc-school-district-to-offer-paid-parental-leave/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 12:07:00 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/florence-one-schools-becomes-the-first-sc-school-district-to-offer-paid-parental-leave/ FLORENCE, SC (WMBF) – Florence One Schools has taken a historic step to help its employees. Full-time school district employees now get paid parental leave. The new leave policy includes biological, foster and adoptive parents. It comes after a unanimous vote at the board meeting in July. Superintendent Richard O’Malley first introduced the policy in […]]]>

FLORENCE, SC (WMBF) – Florence One Schools has taken a historic step to help its employees.

Full-time school district employees now get paid parental leave. The new leave policy includes biological, foster and adoptive parents.

It comes after a unanimous vote at the board meeting in July.

Superintendent Richard O’Malley first introduced the policy in June, saying not having paid parental leave is barbaric.

Under the new policy, full-time employees who give birth are entitled to six weeks of paid parental leave following the birth of the child. The leave would be paid at 100% of the employee’s base salary.

O’Malley hopes this will not only help recruit but also retain good employees.

“We talk a lot about the things our district is doing to attract and retain not only teachers, but employees from across the district,” O’Malley said. “I think it shows that we care about our employees and their families. We want our employees to be able to be parents and not have to worry about how they will pay their bills. »

Any employee who does not give birth but who is a co-parent is also entitled to two weeks of paid leave.

Employees who adopt or foster a child under 18 are also entitled to parental leave.

“I don’t find it to be very progressive in 2022,” O’Malley said. “I think that’s something we needed to do. The governor signed a bill to provide state employees with paid maternity leave for six weeks, followed by two weeks for paid paternal leave and they’ve somehow excluded teachers from state employee status. I don’t think that sends the right message for what we’re trying to do in our state. In schools Florence 1, we value families.

Copyright 2022 WMBF. All rights reserved.

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New Township of Bristol. School district superintendent says schools must be ‘positive and supportive’ https://astoriaschools.org/new-township-of-bristol-school-district-superintendent-says-schools-must-be-positive-and-supportive/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 19:21:18 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/new-township-of-bristol-school-district-superintendent-says-schools-must-be-positive-and-supportive/ New Superintendent Michael Nitti speaking to the public on Thursday. Credit: Tom Sofield/LevittownNow.com Michael Nitti will officially be the next Superintendent of Bristol Township School District. At their meeting Thursday night, the school board voted to hire Nitti on a five-year contract that will pay him $210,000 a year. The new superintendent will start at […]]]>
New Superintendent Michael Nitti speaking to the public on Thursday.
Credit: Tom Sofield/LevittownNow.com

Michael Nitti will officially be the next Superintendent of Bristol Township School District.

At their meeting Thursday night, the school board voted to hire Nitti on a five-year contract that will pay him $210,000 a year.

The new superintendent will start at Bristol Township School District on Monday, November 21. He announced he was leaving his position at his current employer, Ewing Township Public Schools, New Jersey, where he had served as superintendent since 2009.

Nitti, father and husband, said he knew he wanted to be a teacher as soon as he was in college and worked in the classroom as soon as he graduated.

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“The most important work done every day is in the schools, in the classrooms with these children,” he said.

Nitti called his move from the classroom to administration a “difficult decision” that challenged him and helped him grow as an administrator.

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Nitti said he would focus on students and was delighted to see how student-focused Bristol Township School District staff and administration were already.

Credit: Tom Sofield/LevittownNow.com

“I can’t wait to get on board,” said Nitti. “I’m really looking forward to this trip.”

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As Nitti prepares for the end of his term as head of the Ewing School System and crosses the Delaware River to Bristol Township, he will submit a plan to the Bristol Township School District before he begins.

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Nitti saw Ewing Township Public School as part of an extensive facility renovation project.

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Bucks County Intermediate Unit Executive Director Dr. Mark Hoffman, who helped the Bristol Township School District search for its next leader, spoke with Nitti and read questions from the audience.

Dr. Mark Hoffman asks Nitti a question.
Credit: Tom Sofield/LevittownNow.com

Nitti said he came to Bristol Township in New Jersey, which has one of the most comprehensive bullying programs at school.

“Our schools need to be as positive and supportive as possible,” he said.

Nitti said he also plans to expand communication between parents and the district. It also aims to refine platforms to alert parents to significant incidents.

“There are great stories in our schools and people need to know about them,” he said.

After the COVID-19 closures and the return to classrooms, everyone shares responsibility for student success and the district needs to focus on learning and making schools positive and fun for students, said Nitti.

The new superintendent said schools need to focus on bringing people together and being inclusive.

Nitti said he plans to be visible and available to parents who reach out.

Nitti replaces Superintendent Dr. Melanie Gehrens, who retired after 14 years with the district, including seven as district leader.

The Bucks County Intermediate Unit held a nationwide search for the new superintendent.

The intermediate unit had 21 candidates applying for the position. A total of 10 finalists were selected, interviewed and five finalists went through a second round of interviews. A third and final round for the last two candidates took place.

Nitti was chosen as the top candidate, which he said included lengthy conversations with the school board.

Right after Nitti’s contract was approved, the district’s Drummer with Attitude band performed and the new superintendent and several school district officials participated.

Credit: Tom Sofield/LevittownNow.com
Credit: Tom Sofield/LevittownNow.com
Credit: Tom Sofield/LevittownNow.com
Credit: Tom Sofield/LevittownNow.com

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Hobbs School District uses new AI cameras to detect guns https://astoriaschools.org/hobbs-school-district-uses-new-ai-cameras-to-detect-guns/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 03:12:00 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/hobbs-school-district-uses-new-ai-cameras-to-detect-guns/ LUBBOCK, Texas (KCBD) – As students, parents and teachers prepare for the upcoming school year, the administration of the Hobbs Municipal School District has worked tirelessly all summer to ensure that they are keeping students safe this year, implementing a new artificial intelligence camera system called Zero Eyes. Gene Strickland, Superintendent of Hobbs Municipal Schools, […]]]>

LUBBOCK, Texas (KCBD) – As students, parents and teachers prepare for the upcoming school year, the administration of the Hobbs Municipal School District has worked tirelessly all summer to ensure that they are keeping students safe this year, implementing a new artificial intelligence camera system called Zero Eyes.

Gene Strickland, Superintendent of Hobbs Municipal Schools, said: “This time of year is always an exciting time for everyone, educators as well as parents and students, so it’s a part of our ecosystem that can bring some peace and comfort knowing that we’re providing protection that wasn’t there before and wasn’t available.

It uses existing cameras in the facilities to detect anything that looks like a gun. The images are then sent to dispatchers who review them and alert administration and security on site.

In most active shooting scenarios, it takes several minutes to detect when a weapon is in place. ZeroEyes dispatchers do nothing but wait and watch for suspicious activity, so a potential shooter can be detected and stopped before any shots are fired. The system uses existing cameras in the school, so if the school cameras see anything suspicious, ZeroEyes is too.

ZeroEyes founder Dustin Brooks says, “We wait three to five seconds between alert and verification until the customer receives the alert.”

Once customers receive the alert, law enforcement officers are dispatched to ensure the threat stops there.

Gene Strickland said: “Unfortunately, we have Uvalde to look up to. At the start of this investigation, ZeroEyes, had it been deployed the way we deployed it, this individual would never have had access to our building.

Hobbs Municipal Schools strategically placed ZeroEyes in over 40% of their cameras districtwide to prevent a mass shooting from occurring.

Copyright 2022 KCBD. All rights reserved.

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Mental health issues for some students in South San Francisco Unified School District | Local News https://astoriaschools.org/mental-health-issues-for-some-students-in-south-san-francisco-unified-school-district-local-news/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 11:45:00 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/mental-health-issues-for-some-students-in-south-san-francisco-unified-school-district-local-news/ Student mental health has been impacted during the pandemic, causing spikes in anxiety and depression and difficulty returning to in-person classes for some students in the South San Francisco Unified School District, according to an end update. of year. “In a global post-pandemic environment, our children are the raw nerve endings. They are the ones […]]]>

Student mental health has been impacted during the pandemic, causing spikes in anxiety and depression and difficulty returning to in-person classes for some students in the South San Francisco Unified School District, according to an end update. of year.

“In a global post-pandemic environment, our children are the raw nerve endings. They are the ones who express the collective grief and trauma that we experience as a community,” said Jane Chandler, senior director of the Office of Youth Mental Health Services at Urban Services YMCA.

Chandler outlined major mental health stressors for students at the district board meeting on Thursday, July 14, identifying social media, remote learning and a struggle to reacclimate to education. in person as key issues.

At the end of this past school year, YSB was providing direct services to 525 students on SSFUSD campuses for a total of 4,194 individual and group therapy sessions. These figures are up 20% compared to the previous year when 479 students were served for a total of 3,432 sessions.

The prevalence of certain mental health problems among these students is also on the rise. More than 70% of the 525 students suffer from depression and about 75% suffer from anxiety, two rates that exceed statistics from previous years, Chandler said. Alternatively, Chandler said drug addiction appears to be on the decline.

As for what contributes to the increased difficulty, Chandler said college students, especially girls, are inundated with posts online about their appearance, causing many to suffer from body dysmorphia.

“Social media is good in some ways, but it’s really, for young people, it’s really destructive,” Chandler said. “They’re just inundated with a ton of information and I think kids absorb that information and interpret it in different ways.”

The demographics of students seeking treatment haven’t changed much, Chandler noted, with the majority of students receiving treatment coming from Latino households and college students needing the most support.

But the population of Asian and Arab students seeking support has also increased this year. After speaking with clinicians, Chandler said it was difficult to determine the cause of the increase, but speculated that the lack of structure could have disrupted the confidence of students who had already done well at the school.

She also wondered if students from monolingual households had it harder during the pandemic because their parents were unable to provide stronger academic support. Clinicians at all grade levels said they worked with students who were having trouble worrying about their lessons or who were starting to self-harm in nonsuicidal ways.

But with regular counseling, Chandler said many students show signs of recovery. According to an end-of-year assessment, more than 30% of students exhibit improved social and emotional behaviors, nearly 20% have improved academic behavior, and more than 10% have shown improved academic performance and grades.

“Not only are schools essential players in a reformed mental health system that openly addresses healing, justice and structural racism, but they are also places of essential services for children,” Chandler said, theorizing that the increased demand for services is also due in part to returning students. to in-person instruction and to be closer to on-campus mental health support.

Trustees commended Chandler and the YSB staff for their work and voted unanimously to invest more than $600,000 in the program for the upcoming school year. Administrator Chialin Hsieh thanked Chandler for helping students feel better while administrator Patricia Murray said she believes mental health care should be as widely available as physical health care.

Board chairman John Baker said he was not surprised to hear that rates of depression and anxiety were on the rise among students. Many children have spent much of their formative years away from their peers and the classroom during the pandemic and have expressed their concerns in different settings, he said.

“We heard it from the students who showed up here. We heard it during our campus visits. A two-year disruption in the grand scheme of my life isn’t that much, but in a student’s life, it’s a big part of his life to be uncomfortable for so long” , Baker said. “That’s why you’re so important.”

It is not known how many students may still need additional support. Students are usually referred to a clinician by campus staff who usually know if a clinician has room in their workload to support another client. Students or their families can contact directly, Chandler noted.

There is still work to be done to publicize program offerings. Baker said students often express appreciation for having access to mental health services, but many are unaware they are available. He acknowledged that clinicians are likely overwhelmed, but also argued that the increased demand is meeting the growing needs of students. Campus staff are in the best position to recommend that students support given how often they interact, he added.

“We’re the people who have the most day-to-day contact with students outside of their families of course, so hopefully we’re there to recognize when they’re having trouble,” Baker said. “They are happy that the services exist, but we have to work together as a district and as BSJ to make sure you are there.

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Crossroads School Districts See Gains and Struggles in 2022 STAAR Results | New https://astoriaschools.org/crossroads-school-districts-see-gains-and-struggles-in-2022-staar-results-new/ Sun, 17 Jul 2022 01:01:41 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/crossroads-school-districts-see-gains-and-struggles-in-2022-staar-results-new/ Students in Crossroads school districts achieved STAAR Middle and Elementary School Assessment scores mostly in line with the statewide trend of limited recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. Calhoun County DSI In Calhoun schools, each grade level saw an increase in the percentage of students who met grade level standards in reading in 2021. Math results […]]]>

Students in Crossroads school districts achieved STAAR Middle and Elementary School Assessment scores mostly in line with the statewide trend of limited recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Calhoun County DSI

In Calhoun schools, each grade level saw an increase in the percentage of students who met grade level standards in reading in 2021. Math results were just a few percentage points away from that same point. mark.

The results were rather mixed compared to pre-pandemic figures, with some grade levels still below their 2019 results, particularly in math.

The district’s raw numbers were better than many surrounding districts, but a significant number of students still struggled, with 59% of seventh graders in math and 40% of sixth graders in reading falling into the category. lowest result of “has not reached school level”. ”

Cuero ISD

Nearly every grade level in the Cuero School District saw significant jumps from 2021 on reading and math tests, and most grades also saw jumps from 2019 tests in reading.

Like most districts in Texas, students have been slower to recover from math tests — with the exception of sixth grade, every grade level is still behind 2019 in meeting grade level standards .

Unlike many districts, no grade level has seen a majority of students fall into the “did not meet grade level” category, which means fewer students in Cuero will need academic intervention. intensive to reach the standard for their next year.

Edna CIO

Edna schools followed the pattern of large jumps in the percentage of students reaching grade level from 2021, but also saw significant improvement over 2019 results in reading and math.

Edna’s math scores were strong compared to other districts in the region, with several grade levels growing as of 2019 and nearly a third of students in the highest scoring category.

CIO Goliad

Goliad’s results showed limited improvements compared to other districts in the region, with a number of grade levels falling below last year’s scores on reading and math tests.

There were some positives, like the nearly 30-point jump in fifth-grade reading, but these came with negatives like the fact that in 2021 and 2022, 0% of seventh-grade students were “mastering their grade level standards.

Ian Grenier covers K-12 and higher education for the Victoria Advocate. You can reach him at igrenier@vicad.com.

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School district releases new cellphone policy: No devices in class https://astoriaschools.org/school-district-releases-new-cellphone-policy-no-devices-in-class/ Thu, 14 Jul 2022 02:07:31 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/school-district-releases-new-cellphone-policy-no-devices-in-class/ The Perry School Board voted unanimously Monday to approve a new district-wide policy on cell phone use in the classroom. The Perry Community School District Board of Trustees on Monday unanimously approved a new district-wide policy on cell phone use in the classroom. Under the new rules, students of all grades will return their phones […]]]>

The Perry School Board voted unanimously Monday to approve a new district-wide policy on cell phone use in the classroom.


The Perry Community School District Board of Trustees on Monday unanimously approved a new district-wide policy on cell phone use in the classroom. Under the new rules, students of all grades will return their phones when entering the classroom and collect them when leaving.

Students will still be able to use their phones freely between classes and during lunchtime. The policy will be applied daily from 7:55 a.m. to 3:15 p.m.

According to the policy, cellphones and smartwatches have become “a major distraction to the learning environment” in middle and high school “in recent years.” The administrators made the same point to the school board.

“I think the kids are, some of them are downright addicted to their cellphones,” Perry Middle School principal Ned Menke said. “It not only hinders their learning in school, but probably affects every aspect of their life, and we need to do something about it as a school district to recognize a problem and also to help people understand that you don’t. have to have a phone on you all the time.

Perry High School principal Dan Marburger echoed Menke’s view of students’ addiction and overreliance on their gadgets.

“They’ve been a real problem for us,” Marburger told the school board. “We anticipate that this policy will be difficult at all levels. Children are used to having them. They are used to looking at them. I would say – there is no science to this, but I would say 80% of the text messages they get today are from mom and dad. We’re going to have to, you know, go back to the way we used to do things.

It used to be that a parent wishing to communicate with their child would call the school’s main office and the message would be passed on to the child from there. PCSD Superintendent Clark Wicks said he hopes the new policy will improve the learning environment.

“What this policy does is it gives administrators and teachers great support if approved by the board,” Wicks said. “He says we are serious about it. Then we have to, as a team of not just administrators, but as a school, accept that this is going to help students and help them learn. And I think it will help teachers to teach.

The administration was equally supportive.

“I feel like we needed a bit of a stronger policy and we need to be more consistent across teachers on how we handle cellphones,” Marburger said. “It will give us that.”

“I think this policy is necessary,” Menke said. “We realize that we will have to do some upstream training for students in particular, but I think that’s an effort that we need to tackle.”

PCSD School Board President Linda Andorf, a retired teacher who still serves in the Perry school system, said the policy will need to be applied consistently.

“App consistency is going to be very crucial because there are classrooms where it’s been okay for phones to be taken out and used,” Andorf said. “If we say, ‘You’re not going to get them’, we need to make sure everyone follows it, because there’s no point in having a policy if we don’t enforce it.”

Penalties for violating the policy gradually increase, with the phone confiscated and parents possibly notified. PCSD school board principal Travis Landgrebe said it might be best to involve parents early on when there are issues.

“I think parents should really be involved from the start,” Landgrebe said, “but we need a policy, and it’s a start.”

The new policy can also be viewed on the school district website.

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