High school – Astoria Schools http://astoriaschools.org/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 19:40:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://astoriaschools.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-31T000949.167.png High school – Astoria Schools http://astoriaschools.org/ 32 32 Cassville High School teacher sentenced to 30 years for sextortion scheme | USAO-WDMO https://astoriaschools.org/cassville-high-school-teacher-sentenced-to-30-years-for-sextortion-scheme-usao-wdmo/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 19:40:56 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/cassville-high-school-teacher-sentenced-to-30-years-for-sextortion-scheme-usao-wdmo/ SPRINGFIELD, Missouri – A Southern Missouri high school teacher was convicted today in federal court of a sextortion scheme in which 11 identified child victims and dozens of other unidentified child victims were coerced into sending him messages. pornographic images and videos. “This defendant, a high school teacher, pretended to be a teenager online in […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD, Missouri – A Southern Missouri high school teacher was convicted today in federal court of a sextortion scheme in which 11 identified child victims and dozens of other unidentified child victims were coerced into sending him messages. pornographic images and videos.

“This defendant, a high school teacher, pretended to be a teenager online in order to prey on young victims across the country,” said U.S. Attorney Teresa Moore. “He victimized 11 children who have been identified, and many more who have yet to be identified, in a horrific scheme of exploitation. He tricked countless child victims into sending him explicit images of themselves, then threatened to share those images with their families and friends on social media unless they continued to send him images and messages. even more explicit videos. Such appalling criminal behavior justifies the severe sentence he received today.

Brandon Lane McCullough, 31, of Branson, Mo., was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Douglas Harpool to 30 years in federal prison without parole. The court also ordered McCullough to spend the rest of his life on probation after his incarceration and to pay $204,199 in restitution to one of his victims.

“Today’s sentencing reflects how despicable and damaging McCullough’s crimes against children are and underscores HSI’s dedication to holding perpetrators accountable,” said Katherine Greer, HSI Special Agent in Charge of the Area. of Kansas City operations. “Alongside our law enforcement partners, we are committed to eradicating sextortion from our communities, but we need the public’s help. HSI asks parents, guardians, teachers, caregivers – anyone who interacts with a child – to be on the lookout and report suspicious online behavior to the appropriate authorities, whether or not the individual is in a position of trust. public, like McCullough.”

McCullough was a business teacher at Cassville High School in the R-4 Cassville School District at the time of the offense.

On August 4, 2021, McCullough pleaded guilty to three counts of sexually exploiting a minor and two counts of coercing and inducing a minor to engage in illicit sexual activity.

The federal investigation began on February 14, 2020, when a New Jersey police detective contacted federal agents in Missouri. The mother of a 14-year-old victim had reported to the local police department that her daughter was using the Kik app to have sexually explicit conversations and send sexually explicit images to McCullough.

McCullough introduced himself as a 15-year-old boy when he started chatting via Kik with Jane Doe 1 in May 2019. McCullough threatened to send the sexually explicit images and videos to family and friends of Jane Doe 1 unless she sends him additional images and videos. Jane Doe also engaged in a Kik conversation with another user, who was actually McCullough introducing himself as a 17-year-old boy. When Jane Doe told this fake character she was being blackmailed, he told her to keep going with his demands.

On May 7, 2020, law enforcement officers executed a search warrant at McCullough’s residence. They seized an external hard drive hidden under a basket under a bathroom sink in the basement. The hard drive contained dozens of Kik folders, which contained cats as well as thousands of child pornography images and videos self-produced by the child victims, some of whom were younger than Jane Doe 1.

Based on a forensic examination of the computer hard drive recovered from McCullough’s residence, investigators were able to identify 10 other child victims of McCullough’s sextortion scheme. Dozens of other child victims could not be identified. McCullough followed a similar pattern with each victim, extorting victims to produce sexually explicit images and videos with the promise that he would delete all images once news was sent. When the victims sent the videos and/or images, McCullough would start the cycle over again. This activity started at least as of November 1, 2018.

This case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Ami Harshad Miller. He was investigated by Homeland Security Investigations, the Southwest Missouri Cyber ​​Crimes Task Force, and the Florham Park Borough, New Jersey, Police Department.

Safe Childhood Project

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. Led by the United States Attorney’s Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, Project Safe Childhood brings together federal, state, and local resources to locate, apprehend, and prosecute individuals who exploit child sexual abuse, and to identify and rescue victims. For more information about the Safe Childhood Project, please visit www.usdoj.gov/psc. For more information on Internet Safety Education, please visit www.usdoj.gov/psc and click on the “resources” tab.

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Hawaii High School Football Week 1 Schedule https://astoriaschools.org/hawaii-high-school-football-week-1-schedule/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 03:49:24 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/hawaii-high-school-football-week-1-schedule/ High school football is back in Hawaii. Although the season usually kicks off on the first Friday in August, the last time a high school football season did was in 2019. There was no season in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, while the 2021 regular season has been delayed until mid-September for ILH and […]]]>

High school football is back in Hawaii.

Although the season usually kicks off on the first Friday in August, the last time a high school football season did was in 2019. There was no season in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, while the 2021 regular season has been delayed until mid-September for ILH and mid-October for OIA.

All the sports news from Hawaii’s sports resort

The 2022 season kicks off on Thursday, when Waialua travels to Farrington at Skippa Diaz Stadium for a 6 p.m. kick-off.

After that, a full slate of games will take place on Friday and Saturday, highlighted by Saint Louis taking on Mililani at John Kauinana Stadium on Friday at 7:30 p.m. in a rematch of last season’s epic HHSAA Open Division Semifinals.

The full schedule for week 1 is below:

Thursday

Waialua at Farrington, 6 p.m.

Friday

‘Iolani at Kaiser, 6 p.m.

Punahou at Waipahu, 7 p.m.

Kalani at Moanalua, 7:30 p.m.

St. Louis to Mililani, 7:30 p.m.

Leilehua at Kailua, 7:30 p.m.

Saturday

Pahoa vs. Pac 5 at Skippa Diaz Stadium in Farrington, 3 p.m.

Kealakehe to Kapolei, 3 p.m.

McKinley at Roosevelt, 5:30 p.m.

Kalaheo vs. Damien at Skippa Diaz Stadium, 6 p.m.

Kapa’a at Aiea, 6:30 p.m.

Waianae at the Castle, 6:30 p.m.

Kamehameha at Kahuku, 7 p.m.

Kaimuki at Waimea, 7 p.m.

Pearl City at Kauai, 7:30 p.m.

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Preparing your children for life after high school | Customer Perspectives https://astoriaschools.org/preparing-your-children-for-life-after-high-school-customer-perspectives/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 11:15:00 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/preparing-your-children-for-life-after-high-school-customer-perspectives/ madison blanton Person-centered thinking is a pretty simple concept: put people first, listen carefully to learn who they are and what they want out of life, then work together to set and achieve goals. As a parent, you spend a lot of your time standing up for what you think your child needs. Now, as […]]]>






madison blanton


Person-centered thinking is a pretty simple concept: put people first, listen carefully to learn who they are and what they want out of life, then work together to set and achieve goals. As a parent, you spend a lot of your time standing up for what you think your child needs. Now, as you help your child transition from high school to the next, it’s essential to move from what you see for your child’s future to what they want and see for their future in order to to help find it and achieve it.

Parents of children everywhere should recognize this and work hard to make it a reality. As a parent of someone with an intellectual disability, this is especially important.

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Opening of the local high school choir for foreigners https://astoriaschools.org/opening-of-the-local-high-school-choir-for-foreigners/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 03:31:10 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/opening-of-the-local-high-school-choir-for-foreigners/ A local high school choir had the opportunity of a lifetime Wednesday night. The students opened for one of America’s most famous bands. The General McLane Choir has been preparing for this moment ever since they got the call to premiere the legendary group Foreigner. General McLane High School Choir will open for foreigners “It’s […]]]>

A local high school choir had the opportunity of a lifetime Wednesday night.

The students opened for one of America’s most famous bands.

The General McLane Choir has been preparing for this moment ever since they got the call to premiere the legendary group Foreigner.

“It’s a great opportunity for us, and we feel very lucky to be singing with one of the greatest bands of all time. It’s awesome,” said Bruce Yates, vocal music director of the General McLane High School.

“I think we’re really proud and honored to be a part of this, and I’m really grateful to be able to be a part of this together like everyone else. We are all very grateful for that,” said student Tobeigh Ingram.

While on tour, Foreigner involved students in the shows hoping it would help their musical careers.

“We hope the kids have a real live musical experience tonight, and if they’re considering a career, maybe it will move them in that direction, and if anything else, music education helps. so many other aspects of education,” said Foreign Fellow Jeff Pilson.

But it’s not just here. The group works with the Grammy Foundation and donates money to high school music programs and gives students the opportunity to be the opening act on stage.

“We want to bring the choirs there, let them sing, and then sell CDs so the proceeds can go to their school to help their music education. It’s a win-win and something we’re so excited we can do anywhere,” Pilson said.

For Wednesday’s opening, the choir students sang for the first 15 minutes performing four a capella songs before Foreigner took the stage.

“I think it’s just a really good opportunity for the community to see that a small band like us, like a high school, can perform alongside a band like this,” said Isaac Smith, student.

The group will make its next stop in Columbus.

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The band also donated $500 to General McLane’s Choir program to help with their musical education.

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Central High School football enters new season with fresh eyes https://astoriaschools.org/central-high-school-football-enters-new-season-with-fresh-eyes/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 04:02:00 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/central-high-school-football-enters-new-season-with-fresh-eyes/ EVANSVILLE, Ind. (WFIE) – High school football is just around the corner, and teams have already hit the weight rooms and fields, including the Central Bears. The historically dominant football program had a tough time, finishing with a 2-8 record last season, but as head coach Andy Zirkelbach said – the programs have their ups […]]]>

EVANSVILLE, Ind. (WFIE) – High school football is just around the corner, and teams have already hit the weight rooms and fields, including the Central Bears.

The historically dominant football program had a tough time, finishing with a 2-8 record last season, but as head coach Andy Zirkelbach said – the programs have their ups and downs, and although there are only a handful of seniors, he says the whole list arrived this summer with a desire to lead.

Zirkelbach enters his second season at the helm with fresh eyes and a whole new roster.

“It’s pedaling towards the medal this year,” said Zirkelbach. “Last year we learned a lot, got to know people and felt there. This year we have a more defined approach, because we know who the children are, as far as older children are concerned and what their abilities are. . It was exciting to watch our older children evolve and develop and the younger ones follow suit.

Senior center receiver Luke Pokorney said he is focused on the new season ahead and leaving last season behind.

“First of all, you have to wipe last year”, Pokorney. “I have to come with a bigger and better mentality. You just have to think that you are the best team, you are the best player, no one is better than you, as soon as you step onto this pitch you don’t stop until the whistle. I think that’s what we are capable of doing.

Second-year center quarterback Zaylen Price says he’s proud to be part of the team.

“We’ve been going 7v7 just trying to get better with scrums and stuff, see what we work with, see what we can do this season,” Price said. “Just proud to be here.”

The Bears kick off their program Aug. 19 with Mater Dei on their home turf.

Copyright 2022 WFIE. All rights reserved.

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‘Male college crisis’: Male high school graduates go to college at much lower rates | New https://astoriaschools.org/male-college-crisis-male-high-school-graduates-go-to-college-at-much-lower-rates-new/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/male-college-crisis-male-high-school-graduates-go-to-college-at-much-lower-rates-new/ Nationally, it’s been described as a “male college crisis,” and Indiana isn’t immune to the trend. Male high school graduates attend college at much lower rates than females, and this gap continues to widen. Indiana higher education officials describe it as “a concerning gap… This is the first time in recent history that the male […]]]>

Nationally, it’s been described as a “male college crisis,” and Indiana isn’t immune to the trend. Male high school graduates attend college at much lower rates than females, and this gap continues to widen.

Indiana higher education officials describe it as “a concerning gap… This is the first time in recent history that the male college attendance rate has fallen below half (46%) “, in reference to the high school graduating class of 2020.

In contrast, the college attendance rate for Hoosier women in 2020 was 61%.

The report focused on the overall decline in college attendance, with only 53% of Indiana high school graduates going to college in 2020, a year-long drop described as “alarming” by Chris Lowery, Indiana’s new higher education commissioner.

The gender gap, one of the elements of the report, “got a lot of people’s attention,” Lowery said in an interview.

The commission is studying the data and possible reasons why fewer men are choosing college, defined as the full range of degrees beyond high school, including degrees of less than one year up to a four-year degree year.

Possible reasons include affordability issues and the perception that it’s too expensive, Lowery said. Some may not see the value of college or wonder if it has the career relevance it had in the past.

But when you look at economic data, including unemployment, labor force participation and wages, “quantitatively it pays off,” he said.

“There are clear economic benefits that come with higher levels of education. People with a bachelor’s degree or higher are more likely to be employed and participate in the workforce, and they have significantly higher salaries and higher overall net worth,” Lowery said.

The stakes are high both for the people concerned and for the state and the economy. Among those who don’t pursue post-secondary education, “that person’s prospects for lifelong economic and social mobility become more limited,” Lowery said.

That doesn’t mean someone can’t be successful, he said, “but statistically the prospects for social and economic mobility are diminishing,” he said.

The decline in male participation in college is also important to Indiana’s economy and the ability of employers to get the talent they need in a tight job market. “Indiana has a booming economy,” Lowery said, but declining male participation in post-secondary education is exacerbating the challenges and availability of this talent pool.

Among the organizations that have taken notice is the Indiana Chamber of Commerce.

The overall decline in college participation in Indiana, and among Hoosier men in particular, “is a cause for grave concern in an economy that strongly favors workers with education and training beyond high school” said Jason Bearce, state chamber vice president for education and workforce development. .

Today, companies are looking closely at state and metro education levels when deciding where to relocate or expand their businesses, “so we absolutely need to turn those numbers upside down to keep Indiana competitive,” he said. Bearce.

Searching for answers

Rachel Meyer, the Commission’s regional outreach coordinator for the western Indiana region, helps high school students prepare for college, including efforts to secure financial aid.

She spoke with male high school students who don’t plan on going to college. “I like the students in my region. They’re brutally honest, which I love,” she said. “They give a lot of great feedback.” Based on her discussions, she believes that one of the main reasons is that these students are unsure of what they want to do after high school and are reluctant to enter college without having a “final destination” in mind in terms of career.

The young men she speaks with also worry about the perceived cost of college. She’ll ask them to guess how much Indiana public college tuition is, and someone might throw away $200,000 for a year.

She will point out that the most expensive state public college tuition is just over $10,000 per year.

Other factors also come into play. Many students are in homestay, or they may be couch surfing or homeless. Their basic human needs are not being met, “so it doesn’t leave them much room to plan or dream when really they just want to know if they’re going to have dinner tonight”, a place to sleep or an opportunity to take a shower, Meyer said.

The challenge becomes, “How can we give them the aspiration to think about the future when the present is so urgent and they have a lot on their minds, a lot on their hearts,” Meyer said.

For those who have chosen not to pursue post-secondary education, she knows that many go into the military or the trades and can have “pretty lucrative careers.”

The commission continues to research why young men are not going to college and what they are doing instead.

Other Views

In a November 2021 article for Inside Higher Education, Angela Baldasare wrote: “While the exact causes of this trendline are difficult to pinpoint, pressures on men to work and provide are commonly cited, as are climates and non-male-friendly campus services, heightened uncertainty during the pandemic, negative impacts of the pandemic on career choices, refusal to take online courses, and lack of internet access and/or of technology.

Insight into Diversity, in a March 16 online post, suggests that the pandemic appears to have worsened disparity, especially for men of color and those from underserved backgrounds in urban and rural areas.

“Many experts agree that better support needs to be given to male students from early childhood,” the article said. “Some theories suggest that the decline of underrepresented males begins in K-12 education, as boys on the whole are more likely to be held back, drop out, and have difficulty coping. In high school, young men of all demographic groups tend to earn lower GPAs than young women in English, math, social studies, and science, according to research by ACT Inc.”

Sylvester Edwards, a Terre Haute community leader and president of the Greater Terre Haute branch of the NAACP, suggests that young people, including men, choose not to attend college because they see no future. “Therefore, why go to college?”

He added: “I think the spirit of the times is very dark in terms of what our young people watch and see.”

From climate change to American political division to military conflicts overseas, young people see life as “so dark that they’ve given up,” he said. “I don’t know why there is such a pessimistic attitude with young people. Maybe it’s because we haven’t given them reason to be optimistic.

Indiana State University sociology professor Tom Steiger suggests that more and more young men are finding well-paying jobs in the skilled trades and becoming plumbers, electricians, carpenters, and more.

“The harbinger of the growing gender gap started years ago, but really started to show up with millennials,” he said. More young men have opted for the skilled trades.

Obama-era policies emphasized trades training, as did the Trump administration, Steiger said. Add to that restructured immigration policies, and “men are just responding to the market and a culture that defines these professions as for men.”

What can be done?

Lowery said the response must involve policies, programs and partnerships.

One policy suggested by the commission is to automatically enroll all eligible students into the 21st Century Scholars program; currently, less than half of eligible students enroll in the program. Eighty-one percent of scholarship recipients go to college.

In terms of curriculum, the commission recommends expanding programs already underway, such as the Indiana College Core, a 30-credit general education block that transfers between Indiana’s public institutions.

High school students who earn the Indiana College Core enroll in a series of dual-credit courses, allowing them to earn high school and college credits at the same time.

About 90% of students who earned the Indiana College Core last year went on to the next step, Lowery said. “It’s incredible.”

Partnerships are also key, he said. Young people, or even older students, want to hear from a trusted messenger, “and that’s not necessarily the government.”

Partnerships can involve non-profit organizations such as Boys and Girls Clubs; faith-based organizations; and employers.

As an example of partnerships, employers could host FAFSA graduation parties for employees with school-aged children or they could host college fairs so students can learn about career options. .

Bearce agreed that partnerships are key, especially those that provide greater opportunities for students to engage in meaningful work and learning experiences, including internships and apprenticeships, before they graduate from college. ‘secondary studies. “A lot of male students who think it’s a choice between working or going to school are going to choose a paycheck, so we need to give them relevant options to do both at the same time,” Bearce said. “Employers today are so desperate for talent that they may settle for less skilled workers, but they will be much more selective as the labor market evolves.”

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Evergreen Park High School ring lost 45 years ago found with owner’s family https://astoriaschools.org/evergreen-park-high-school-ring-lost-45-years-ago-found-with-owners-family/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 19:47:28 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/evergreen-park-high-school-ring-lost-45-years-ago-found-with-owners-family/ article CREDIT: Evergreen Park High School EVERGREEN PARK, Illinois. – A class ring from Evergreen Park Community High School that was lost 45 years ago is finally reunited with the owner’s family. The ring was buried in a lake in Texas, until a man named Mark went looking for arrowheads. “He found a bunch of […]]]>

CREDIT: Evergreen Park High School

A class ring from Evergreen Park Community High School that was lost 45 years ago is finally reunited with the owner’s family.

The ring was buried in a lake in Texas, until a man named Mark went looking for arrowheads.

“He found a bunch of arrowheads and a number of other items, including this class ring that said Evergreen Park High School 1977,” said Tim Moran, director of public relations, Evergreen Park Community High School.

The ring had the name Debra Thiessen inscribed on it.

Mark kept the ring for 22 years before showing it to his colleague, Randy, who suggested they call the school.

After the roll call at Evergreen Park High School, school staff went through Debra Thiessen’s records, but she was listed as “missing,” so they turned to a higher power.

CREDIT: Evergreen Park High School

The power of social media and people looking for strangers, people you’ve never heard of before,” Moran said.

Social media did, stalking Debra Thiessen’s daughter in Texas.

Debra had moved to Texas shortly after high school, but died three years ago.

Moran spoke with the girl last Friday.

“She’s broken up on the phone with me a few times. She’s just really emotional right now. The ring is going to be reunited with the family and her mom is smiling somewhere,” Moran said.

On Thursday, Moran said the girl finally found the class ring.

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Bennington’s parents worried about new high school proposal https://astoriaschools.org/benningtons-parents-worried-about-new-high-school-proposal/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 04:24:00 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/benningtons-parents-worried-about-new-high-school-proposal/ A debate over a high school project is brewing in Bennington after the school board agreed to buy 78 acres of land near a former landfill, closed 30 years ago. The land is located near 132nd and Rainwood. The district hopes to build a second high school because the existing one lacks space. “We started […]]]>

A debate over a high school project is brewing in Bennington after the school board agreed to buy 78 acres of land near a former landfill, closed 30 years ago. The land is located near 132nd and Rainwood. The district hopes to build a second high school because the existing one lacks space. “We started looking for land several months ago as we plan, as you can see the numbers, to anticipate a second high school in the next four to five years,” said Terry Haack, Superintendent of Public Schools. of Bennington. But parents say they are concerned about the location saying it will cause traffic jams. And they also have environmental concerns. Although the soil has passed EPA standards and tests in the past, some parents still worry about the future. “The technology used and the EPA requirements for mitigating gas and chemical leaks into the ground were probably lower 30 years ago than the standards we have in place today,” said Jeremy Dick. , a parent. Superintendent Haack defends the purchase saying their research companies rank it high on different factors. They’re also open to doing more discharge tests, but couldn’t say when. “You know we understand if we have to go further to prove that this is a safe environment for children,” Haack said. Residents who live near the site say they still have many questions. I will not sell. So to me it’s a worthless place to have a school,” said Bennington resident Tom Smith. Nothing is set in stone yet. The high school’s second plan is part of a broader bond proposal the board hopes to put to the November ballot.

A debate over a high school project is brewing in Bennington after the school board agreed to buy 78 acres of land near a former landfill, closed 30 years ago.

The land is located near 132nd and Rainwood. The district hopes to build a second high school because the existing one lacks space.

“We started looking for land several months ago as we plan, as you can see the numbers, to anticipate a second high school in the next four to five years,” said Terry Haack, Superintendent of Public Schools. of Bennington.

But parents say they are concerned about the location saying it will cause traffic jams. And they also have environmental concerns. Although the soil has passed EPA standards and tests in the past, some parents still worry about the future.

“The technology used and the EPA requirements for mitigating gas and chemical leaks into the ground were probably lower 30 years ago than the standards we have in place today,” said Jeremy Dick. , a parent.

Superintendent Haack defends the purchase saying their research companies rank it high on different factors. They’re also open to doing more discharge tests, but couldn’t say when.

“You know we understand if we have to go further to prove that this is a safe environment for children,” Haack said.

Residents who live near the site say they still have a lot of questions.

“You have to have development. There has to be housing just to pay for that. The second part B of that is the land around is all farmers, they’re not going to sell. So for me it’s a place with no value to have a school,” said Bennington resident Tom Smith.

Nothing is set in stone yet. The high school’s second plan is part of a broader bond proposal the board hopes to put to the November ballot.

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Padres win high school ace Lesko in 1st round of MLB Draft – NBC 7 San Diego https://astoriaschools.org/padres-win-high-school-ace-lesko-in-1st-round-of-mlb-draft-nbc-7-san-diego/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 03:15:01 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/padres-win-high-school-ace-lesko-in-1st-round-of-mlb-draft-nbc-7-san-diego/ The Padres are squarely out of rebuilding mode and consider themselves in championship mode. This means that their focus has shifted from storing talent to winning now. Two days before the MLB draft, I asked the Padres director of amateur recruiting, Chris Kemp, if that had any bearing on whether they took a high school […]]]>

The Padres are squarely out of rebuilding mode and consider themselves in championship mode. This means that their focus has shifted from storing talent to winning now.

Two days before the MLB draft, I asked the Padres director of amateur recruiting, Chris Kemp, if that had any bearing on whether they took a high school player with a big upside or a college player who is closer to contributing at big league level.

“Those are things that are talked about in the room, but I think whether it’s high school or college, we’re going to take the best player on the board,” Kemp said.

Selected 15th overall, the top player on their roster was Dylan Lesko, a right-handed pitcher from Buford High School in Georgia. It’s hard to dispute that assessment because if he hadn’t injured himself, he might have been the first player taken overall.

Lesko, who in 2021 was the first high school student to win the Gatorade National Player of the Year award, underwent Tommy John surgery just a few months ago. Prior to the injury, he was showing off a ’90s fastball with a big league-ready change and a developing curveball, which he regularly throws for strikes. Part of Baseball America’s analysis of Lesko deals with his makeup, and it’s awfully encouraging:

“Huge prep talent that doesn’t come around often. Has the qualities to be a special pro athlete. With continued growth and development, has the potential to be a top-tier type arm.”

He’s 6’3″ and nearly 200 pounds, so most talent evaluators expect him to fully recover from elbow reconstruction.

LISTEN: With NBC 7 San Diego’s Darnay Tripp and Derek Togerson behind the mic, On Friar will cover all things San Diego Padres. Interviews, analysis, behind the scenes… the ups, downs and everything in between. Tap here to find On Friar wherever you listen to podcasts.

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NPCC Knights Host High School Volleyball Camp https://astoriaschools.org/npcc-knights-host-high-school-volleyball-camp/ Wed, 13 Jul 2022 03:50:00 +0000 https://astoriaschools.org/npcc-knights-host-high-school-volleyball-camp/ NORTH PLATTE, Neb. (KNOP) – Knights of North Platte Community College hosted a two-day camp for local high school teams. The camp was an opportunity for players to get live reps against other teams in the region and for coaches to see all the talent in their teams this season. The camp divided the teams […]]]>

NORTH PLATTE, Neb. (KNOP) – Knights of North Platte Community College hosted a two-day camp for local high school teams. The camp was an opportunity for players to get live reps against other teams in the region and for coaches to see all the talent in their teams this season. The camp divided the teams by division, the varsity teams served as division one teams, while the JV teams served as division two and three.

Knights head coach Alexa McCall led the event. McCall also involves his players by serving as officials for high school games. By involving his players in this way, McCall says it helps them better appreciate who might be officiating their games and it just helps give them a different perspective.

Perspective is gained from both sides, while college players get a different perspective of what it’s like to officiate the game, high school girls can see what it would be like to play for the Knights program.

“Anytime we can bring high school kids or other people into our gym and our facilities, I think it gives them a good taste of what it would be like if they had the opportunity to come to school. here,” McCall says.

While the Knights may not be participating as players at this camp, it allows them to get to know some of the newcomers who will be joining the team this season. McCall considers this one of the biggest benefits of hosting the camp.

“The girls had a chance to meet over the summer. That’s kind of one of the reasons I like that they do that, they meet the freshmen and the sophomores year and start to form these relationships. So it was exciting to see them interact and I think they get excited, you know being together they get excited and it’s shortly before we move in so we’re going to go before we know that,” McCall says.

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